Inversion Therapy

Black And White Photography, Photography, Steven

Inverted, © Steven Willard

We have a tendency to look at things from the bottom up. Generally we scan buildings from the ground up, and landscapes from near to far, which usually means bottom to top. Of course there are exceptions; dramatic images of clouds or mountains for instance, or portraits where we usually are drawn to the eyes first regardless of where the eyes are in the frame.

As an exercise, I’ve been trying to make photographs that turn things upside down, that draw the eyes first to the top of the frame, then work their way to the bottom. It produces a tension we aren’t used to in seeing in images. Finding these images is not as easy as it sounds, and I offer it as a challenge.

These bare branches hanging down from a clump of pine needles reminded me of roots working their way deeper and deeper into the earth; the textured wall in the background serving the visual equivalent of earth. While this image was photographed as presented, it works almost as well when inverted. Try looking at it that way.

Olympus OMD EM5 file processed in Snapseed and Stackables on my iPad Air.

Joshua Tree National Park

Black And White Photography, Photography, Steven

Joshua Tree National Park © Steven Willard

One of the most interesting places I’ve ever visited, Joshua Tree is about as different from the green, tree covered Connecticut where I have lived for more than twenty years as Mars is from Earth. Everywhere I pointed the camera there were more images to be had than time to make them. I could easily spend a week there.

Olympus EM-5 with the Olympus 14-45mm f3.5-5.6 II R kit zoom. Processed in Snapseed.